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Billboard Rendering

Recently, I was asked to render a couple concepts for billboards that would appear to blend in with their surroundings as opposed to just being placed on site. The following images were created to show what landscaping the existing site would do to create this effect. The ads were just place-holders as their was no end client at this stage. 

The first concept rendering above shows the site coming up to meet the signage. There is a neighborhood in the background that would also be exposed to the advertising so consideration was taken to hide the signage from their perspective while giving them a barrier both physical and visual between their property and the road. 

The landscape grows to support the structure. Retaining walls were used to step the site and raise it to a level just below the sign. The site for this project was yet to be determined, but it was planned for suburban Philadelphia. This houses are used for context to understand how the design would effect a typical suburban Philadelphia community. 

The second option revised the initial concept in a more compact and less organic design. The landscape is still terraced, but incorporates more natural materials. Both options utilize water elements. The smaller footprint of the second option can be seen in the aerial rendering. The use of two renderings per concept allows the viewer to see a perspective of the design as it would be experienced in real life. The use of aerial renderings provide context and allow the viewer to engage the design by quickly orienting them. This is especially useful when explaining your design to people that may not be able to read elevation and plan drawings. 



Architectural Rendering & Photography

Rendering highlighting a Classics line of furniture

Architectural visualization and Architectural photography are very similar. Creating an interior rendering is basically shooting an architectural photograph of an interior. The only real difference is that in the case of the rendering, the artist is building (digitally) the space and the objects in it. Both artist and photographer light the scene and stage it to create a visually appealing image.  Both need to understand light and form in order to bring out the subtle and essential details in the design. 

These days photographers are more digital artists than photographers. Taking as many as thirty shots of the same view, in order to composite them together in post production. The photographer is spending more time “creating” the image than “capturing” it. There is no right or wrong to this approach, however there is something to be said for being able to get the shot right “in camera”. This means that little post production work is needed other than basic image adjustments similar to what one would do in a dark room.

Rendering too can sometimes rely heavily on post production work to create the image. In some cases this approach can be quicker, however it often locks the artist into one view. In many cases trying to change the view during the revision process can mean essentially starting over. Getting the rendering right in the render engine is not unlike getting the photograph right in camera.  A new angle means placing a new camera and generating a new render, but knowing it will turn out identical in feel and look to the original means that there will be less work in post production.

Interior rendering highlighting a furniture collection for a catalog

Feature rendering highlighting a single furniture piece for a catalog

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